Andromeda Interview

Andromeda Interview

Walk us through the origins of your group. How did you two meet and when did you decide to start making music together?

Grandaddy Swank: We met back in 7th grade. Matt was putting together a backyard football team and asked me to join one day after school. I was already doing music and had a studio set up in my basement. We recorded a diss track [laughs]. Safe to say that was the birth of Andromeda. Bro moved away that summer and we didn’t link back up ’til years later. Now here we are.

Matt Granpap: Honestly bro we go way back. I met swank in 7th grade and we’ve been working since. It’s really just a genuine connection.

 

 


Who are your biggest influences? Can you actively see their styles in any of your songs?

Swank: Nas and Tupac for sure. I can see glimpses of both in my music.

 

 

Tell us about your creative process and what happens when you hit a creative block.

Swank: I like to write in my head, preferably while driving. I’m heavily motivated and influenced by seeing new things and going to new places. When I hit a creative block, I usually take a step back and go learn new words and information. It’s all material.

What’s the best piece of advice another artist ever gave you?

Swank: Never compromise your happiness or yourself.

 

 

What would be your dream collaboration or project to work on?

Swank: My dream collab would be with Andre 3000, Joey Bada$$, and J Cole. We’re all Aquarius’ so I just want to see how deep the track would get.

Matt: Honestly, my dream collaboration would probably be with Kanye West, Andre 3000, and Kodak Black all on one song.

 

What are some changes you’d like to see within the Delaware art community?

Swank: More support for one another. Delaware is small and that could be used as an advantage to really change the game, but people are stuck on how small it is instead of looking at how it is accessible. Nothing’s too far or out of reach over here.

Matt: I’d like to see just maybe more collaboration, more genuine connections, and… Yeah, that’s really it. Just artists working together to build something special.

 

How can people find your content and interact with your group?

Matt: There are a lot of ways people can find our content. The main ways are going to be our YouTube, Bandcamp, or the Digital Acid Records Website.

What’s the best piece of advice another artist ever gave you?

Swank: Never compromise your happiness or yourself.

 

What would be your dream collaboration or project to work on?

Swank: My dream collab would be with Andre 3000, Joey Bada$$, and J Cole. We’re all Aquarius’ so I just want to see how deep the track would get.

Matt: Honestly, my dream collaboration would probably be with Kanye West, Andre 3000, and Kodak Black all on one song.

What are some changes you’d like to see within the Delaware art community?

Swank: More support for one another. Delaware is small and that could be used as an advantage to really change the game, but people are stuck on how small it is instead of looking at how it is accessible. Nothing’s too far or out of reach over here.

Matt: I’d like to see just maybe more collaboration, more genuine connections, and… Yeah, that’s really it. Just artists working together to build something special.

 

How can people find your content and interact with your group?

Matt: There are a lot of ways people can find our content. The main ways are going to be our YouTube, Bandcamp, or the Digital Acid Records Website.

Tell us about ‘The Gateway Tapes.’

Matt: I’ve been making beats for about 8 years but at heart, I’m really a poet. I’ve always viewed what I do to be more along the lines of literature than music. With this album, I kind of walked away from my SP 404 and got some outside help. I went to good ol’ YouTube and discovered Doc Laundry’s music. We released a music video for the single “Zodiak” back in February.

 

What’s next for Andromeda?

Matt: There’re a lot of things in store for Andromeda! I would love to put out more music, but as of right now, I’m focusing on producing Swank’s solo album and putting out more visual content for Matt Granpap via Digital Acid.

How do you think the Delaware Art Society can best support your goals and the goals of other local artists?

Matt: The Delaware Art society can help me reach my goals just by having this conversation right now, you know? By opening up the dialogue for not just myself, but other artists, especially the younger ones that will come behind us and make Delaware a more supportive, creative, and adventurous place. That’s really the key to putting Delaware on the map. Sometimes people don’t understand how much influence hip-hop has on a community, just look at Jay-Z and how his income positively affected his home economy in Brooklyn. I think we could do the same thing here in Delaware. It’s hard, though. We tend to forget how much power we actually hold over our minds and over the economy. Good things can only come from positive vibrations.

Swank: Opportunity and relationships are more valuable than money, so I would say just give as many opportunities for local talent to shine as possible. No one can reach their goals without the opportunity to do so.